stevecrozz

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About stevecrozz

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  1. Yep. I can certainly go through the regular support channel. Although I've learned a bit more about how inotify works and it seems normal that you need one inotify watch per directory even if all the directories have the same parent. From inotify's man page: I think btsync's own log file is telling me when it can and can't add an inotify watch with the phrases "Added path" and "Error while adding watch for ... errno=28". The numbers do seem to add up to what I expected: /opt/btsync$ grep "Added path" < .sync/sync.log | wc -l 8032 /opt/btsync$ grep "Error while adding watch for" < .syn
  2. That's exactly the method I was using to find out who was using all my inotify watches. The total number of inotify watches went from a few dozen to ~25,000 after starting btsync. That combined with the fact that I can always get an inotify watch when I'm not running btsync, and I can never get one when I am running btsync makes me pretty certain the culprit is btsync.
  3. When I start btsync, it very quickly exausts my system's maximum number of inotify watches. I only have a single shared folder, so I would expect btsync to use just one inotify watch and not ~25,000. It's not the end of the world, but it would be nice if btsync was a little friendlier because I like using inotify for other purposes (tail -f for instance). When I try to use tail -f, it warns me saying: tail: inotify resources exhausted tail: inotify cannot be used, reverting to polling Is there something I can do to tell btsync to stop hogging all the inotify watches?
  4. Thanks binarybana, I'm trying the same version of btsync now with a single entry 'Projects' in my .SyncIgnore file. It still isn't ignoring anything. I'm wondering if it has to do with the fact that Projects is actually an encrypted folder mounted with ecryptfs. I'll see I can get .SyncIgnore to work in a smaller folder. The 4-5 hour attempt/fail cycle is not helping me out here.
  5. Can anyone confirm that .SyncIgnore actually functions at all in Linux? I have a huge folder in my home directory that I don't want to index or sync. I tried putting all of these lines in /home/stevecrozz/.SyncIgnore: Projects Projects* Projects/ /home/stevecrozz/Projects /home/stevecrozz/Projects* /home/stevecrozz/Projects/ Then I add my home folder (/home/stevecrozz) to btsync. But the .SyncIgnore has no effect. I can run strace -p<btsyncpid> and I can see btsync stat()ing every file in this this folder which takes forever. When its finally done indexing, it does begin to synchronize t
  6. I'd like more documentation on .SyncIgnore. I tried it out and expected it to work like .gitignore. I can't tell from the documentation how the file should be formatted, other than it should use 'utf-8'. It doesn't seem to do what I want. I think an example for the documentation would help. Here's what I would like to do: $ cat ~/.SyncIgnoresomebigfile.isotmp/Projects/ProjectOne/*.log Basically, I want the ability to ignore files according to patterns and those patterns should apply through the directory tree like they are with .gitignore files. This is basically what I've learned to do with